[[SOLD OUT]] eTown Live Radio Show Taping w/ Calexico & Ray Wylie Hubbard

  • When: September 30, 2015 Time: 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
  • Where: eTOWN HALL / 1535 Spruce Street, Boulder, CO 80302
  • Cost: $25 Plus Applicable Service Fees
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    SOLD OUT

More than just a regular concert, eTown is a unique live experience! Audience members will watch the eTown Broadcast recorded before their very eyes, complete with performances and interviews with both of our visiting artists, as well as the eChievement Award segment, eTown's opportunity to honor everyday heroes who are doing their part to make the world a better place. You won't want to miss it!

Doors: 6:00pm
Show Start: 7:00pm
Show End: 9:00pm


 

Calexico


Image of the two members of the band Calexico

 Calexico is no stranger to negotiating borders. For the better part of two decades, eight albums, and countless trips around the globe, Joey Burns and John Convertino have crossed musical barriers with their band, embracing a multitude of diverse styles, variety in instrumentation, and well-cultivated signature sounds. Under fences it digs and over mountains it climbs, sometimes into untrodden terrain, sometimes towards a more familiar landscape, and sometimes simply walking that fine line to soak up sustenance from all sides. These are men from the desert, yes, but there has always been so much more to Calexico than just heritage and heat. Now, with Edge of the Sun, Burns and Convertino find themselves straddling that celestial division of light and dark, taking inspiration from a trip to a place surprisingly unexplored by the band before, and with the benefit of many friends and comrades to help guide the way.

"When I step back from this record I see the spirit of collaboration," says Burns. "As we began working on it, we started inviting people and it was a natural thing. We've always welcomed guests; it's in our DNA. John and I are really good at hopping in to play with people and improvise but we're also sensitive to what artists need."

"We've collaborated a lot in the past on other records but this one is the most vastly collaborative," says Convertino. "Almost every song has a different guest."

The first outside invitation came when Burns was writing "Bullets and Rocks" and recognized space for a former Calexico collaborator to join. "When putting vocals on that song, it immediately reminded me of the Iron & Wine feel," says Burns. "So I texted Sam (Beam), who wrote back quickly and got it going." Encouraged by that experience, the guest list grew to include musicians from a myriad of backgrounds, origins, and genres, including Ben Bridwell from Band of Horses, Nick Urata from Devotchka, Carla Morrison, Gaby Moreno, Amparo Sanchez, multi-instrumentalists from the Greek band Takim, as well as Neko Case. Burns' older brother John Burns lent a hand to some lyrics and songwriting, and the band's keyboardist, Sergio Mendoza, stepped up to co-write and arrange certain songs, ultimately co-producing the album along with Burns, Convertino, and longtime associate Craig Schumacher. It was, in fact, at Mendoza's suggestion that Calexico would physically cross an actual border for a retreat to the historic Mexico City borough of Coyoacán to begin the writing process for Edge of the Sun.

In view of the fresh creative perspective provided by the band's journey to New Orleans to make its previous album, Algiers, Burns sought Mendoza's involvement in finding a new writing destination. "I wanted to see the band revisit elements in the songwriting that led to songs from [the band's 1998 breakthrough album] The Black Light, so I suggested going to Mexico City," says Mendoza. "To me, it wasnt going back to something they had already done, but rather adding another chapter with Mexican collaborators. The surroundings of Coyoacán really helped bring life to those ideas that were waiting for a special time and place to come out."

"Going to another city to jumpstart the creative writing process helped us to know what this record is about and where we are as a band, like an open canvas with few ties to normal routines when recording and writing," says Burns. "Of course, we have been influenced by Mexican music and culture since the beginning, and you would imagine that a trip to Mexico City would have happened on past projects, but it hadn't. So going to the center of Mexico and seeing an artistic community with such an impressive history as well as notable current musicians really inspired us."

The ten days in Coyoacán were not without their surprises. Initially expecting for the world of Calexico to mesh with the sounds and vibe of Mexico City and take on varied overt Latin influences, Burns and Convertino were amazed when they left the country with some of their poppiest songs to date. Album opener "Falling from the Sky" is earnestly straightforward in its rafter-reaching approach, and "When the Angels Play," with additional vocals and lyrics by Pieta Brown, connects thematically to the Aztecs but, in Burns' words, could have been written anywhere.

Perspective achieved, the band internalized the influence of Mexico and continued to write and record in their home Wavelab studio in Tucson throughout the middle half of 2014. Songs such as the electronica "Cumbia de Donde" and the cinematic swell of "Coyoacán" were direct results of the foreign experience and the type of lessons that can only be realized upon reflection. While Convertino's move to El Paso, Texas, presented another slight border to cross, all this distance only served to inspire and preserve the unique Calexico identity: unconventional timing and instrumental elements, an electrifying live show, and the pushing forward of social connection and ideas to create a profound space.

"It really demonstrates the dynamics of our live show, and I'm hoping this album helps translates some of that energy," says Burns, identifying Edge of the Sun most closely to the wide-ranging styles of their 2003 album Feast of Wire. "We weren't trying to replicate anything or make it hugely different from song to song, but there is some of that carryover, I think. As much as we try to break new ground on records, inevitably there's continuity, which works well on a record like this."

Convertino, too, singles out Feast of Wire as a touchstone for the new album and a special era for Calexico, one that informed the band's unique relationship with space and distance today. "Feast of Wire opened the door for us and attached our sound to the region, helping us discover that we could have that sound and still be our own thing," he says. "Joey and I have talked a lot about space in music; we make sure to give the notes we don't play as much emphasis as the notes we do play, because they're just as important. It's a big part of what Calexico does: we create a space."

Negotiating borders and the spaces within, then inviting others inside those edges: that may be the recipe for Calexico's success. As its empire expands and the familiar pieces join with fresh ideas and a new cohort to pass under wires and across fields and time, Calexico now finds itself here in 2015 on the solar precipice, navigating the edge and trying to find hope in that balance of darkness and light.

"The 'edge of the sun' could be coming from the direction of darkness seeking light, or riding the line between both," says Burns. "Which side of this edge are you on? Traversing along the edge of the sun, that to me feels closest to what this album is and what the band has been, and where we are with this international makeup of musicians. Madrid, Nashville, Tucson, El Paso, Berlin; it's an eclectic mix. All in all, this album is about pushing through the blue to brighter days. Calexico has always had that element of hope, going back and forth between a positive outlook and embracing desperate or dark themes that I think we all share."

www.casedecalexico.com


 

Ray Wylie Hubbard


Ray Wylie Hubbard


When it comes to down ’n’ dirty roots ’n’ roll, nobody in the wide world of Americana music today does it better than Ray Wylie Hubbard. Except, it seems, for Hubbard himself. After riding a decade-long career resurgence into the national spotlight with 2012’s acclaimed The Grifter’s Hymnal and his first ever appearance on the Late Show With David Letterman (“I didn’t want to peak too soon,” quips Hubbard, 68), the iconoclastic Texas songwriter is back to continue his hot streak with The Ruffian’s Misfortune — his 16th album (and third on his own Bordello Records, via Thirty Tigers) — due out April 7, 2015.

From his humble beginnings as an Oklahoma folkie in the ’60s to his wild ride through the ’70s progressive country movement, and onward through the honky-tonk fog of the ’80s to his sobriety-empowered comeback as a songwriter’s songwriter in the ’90s, Hubbard was already a bona fide legend by the time he really found his groove right at the turn of the century. That’s when he finally felt confident enough in his guitar playing to dive headlong into his own inimitable take on the blues, a form he’d admired but steered clear of for decades, thinking its mysteries were beyond his grasp as a basic chord strummer.

“I used to go see Lightnin’ Hopkins and Mance Lipscomb and Freddie King, all those cats, but I never could play like them — I guess because I never took the time or effort to try — until I was in my 40s and learned how to finger pick,” says Hubbard. “Once I learned how to finger pick, I started going, ‘Oh, OK, this is how they did all that!’ Then I started learning open tuning, and then slide, and it was just this incredible freedom that gave all these songs a door to come through that wasn’t there before. It was like all of a sudden having this whole other language or a whole other set of tools to add to my arsenal.”

In lieu of drugs and alcohol, that language became Hubbard’s new addiction — and the title of his 2001 album Eternal and Lowdown somewhat of a self-fulfilling prophecy: 14 years further down the road, he’s still chasing hellhounds deep into the underbelly of the blues, with a Lightnin’ Hopkins gleam in his eyes and a Rolling Stone swagger in his boot steps. The Ruffian’s Misfortune is his latest missive home from this leg of his long journey. Its message? Don’t wait up.

Packing 10 brand new songs into just under 34 minutes, The Ruffian’s Misfortune is the tightest and most focused record of Hubbard’s career; it will also be his first record to be pressed on vinyl in more than 30 years. But its grooves cut just as deep in digital form, every track rumbling like muddy water over a bed of lethal rocks and gnarled roots. The terrain ain’t exactly pretty, but every record Hubbard’s fished, fought, and dragged from those waters — including such fan and critic favorites as 2002’s aptly-titled Growl, 2006’s Snake Farm, and 2010’s A. Enlightenment, B. Endarkenment (Hint: There is no C) — has only strengthened his resolve to follow his gypsy muse closer and closer to that dark river’s source. Hubbard hints that he may someday find his way back to less rocky ground, admitting that he keeps a 12- string on hand “thinking I might go back to more Gordon Lightfoot type stuff … every once in a while the old folkie guy will rear his ugly head” … but The Ruffian’s Misfortune finds him still a long way from that.

“I really liked The Grifter’s Hymnal, and I think The Ruffian’s Misfortune is still kind of a part of that,” he offers, noting that he likes the way both titles would look just as fitting on a dusty old book jacket — or perhaps at the start of a silent movie — as they do on an album cover. But the similarities don’t end there. “This record is pretty much where I am as far as trying to make records that work on a couple of different levels, by laying down a groove with cool guitar tones and vicious nasty licks with lyrics that have a little depth and weight and even a
little humor thrown in, too, as life is pretty much like that.”

Hubbard describes the process of getting those lyrics down just right — with every line and word weighted and measured with a poet’s discipline — as both “a joy and anguish.” But the actual recording this time around went down remarkably quickly, with most of the tracks nailed down live in two or three takes over the course of five days at the Zone studio in Dripping Springs, Texas, right up the road from the rustic Hill Country cabin Hubbard shares with his wife, manager, and record label president, Judy. Hubbard’s ferociously gifted 21-year-old son, Lucas — who’s been holding his own onstage with the old man since his late teens — shared lead guitar duties on the album with the equally talented Gabe Rhodes, swapping leads the whole way through. “I really wanted to have that Ron Wood/Keith Richards two-guitar vibe, you know?” explains Ray Wylie, who of course played a fair amount of guitar himself: namely, all of the slide and acoustic stuff. The bedrock is provided by bassist/co-producer George Reiff and drummer Rick Richards, whose “deep in the pocket,” just-behind-the-beat timing has been Hubbard’s not-so-secret weapon for years on both record and stage. Hubbard raves that Reiff and Richards make for such a potent groove machine that he’s had to share them on more than one occasion with friend (and poacher) Joe Walsh: “He called me up and went, ‘I don’t want to steal your band … but I’m going to steal your Snake Farm band,’” Hubbard recounts with a laugh. “Which of course is a high compliment to George and Rick.”

Sonically, The Ruffian’s Misfortune picks up right where The Grifter’s Hymnal left off, with Hubbard and his wrecking crew confidently jumping from jagged, wicked-cool roots rock (“All Loose Things,” “Down by the River”) to trashy, ’60s-style garage stomp (the ferocious “Chick Singer, Badass Rockin’” and riotous “Bad on Fords”), Mississippi and Texas blues (“Mr. Musselwhite’s Blues,” “Jessie Mae”) and even earnest country-gospel name-checking Sister Rosetta Tharpe (“Barefoot in Heaven”). The songs themselves are rife with wayward souls worthy of both words in the album’s title — sinners, luckless gamblers, drunks, thieves, and at least one beautiful, fierce woman (“Too Young Ripe, Too Young Rotten”). Some of these characters own their misfit/outsider status with a proud and exhilarating air of invincibility (like the aforementioned badass-rockin’ “Chick Singer,” equal parts sloppy cool Chrissie Hynde and sneering Joan Jett), while others are all-too-conscious of their mortality (“Hey Mama, My Time Ain’t Long”) and not overly confident in their prayers for salvation (“Stone Blind Horses”). As narrator and guide, Hubbard doles out more empathy than judgment for the whole motley lot, but his words sting like grit in open wounds just the same. As he puts it rather ominously in the theme-setting opener, “All Loose Things,” “The gods can’t save us from ourselves.”

Actually, Hubbard gives that line to a blackbird — the same animal that also observes, tonguein- beak, “Look at them fools down there, they ain’t got no wings!” It’s an old trick he says he picked up from studying Aesop’s Fables. Of course, Aesop doesn’t get a co-writing credit on that number, nor do Charlie Musselwhite or Jessie Mae Hemphill for directly inspiring “Mr. Musselwhite’s Blues” and “Jessie Mae,” respectively. But Dallas rocker Jonathan Tyler does get one for lending a hand (and a cool guitar lick, although he doesn’t play it himself on the record) in the writing of “Hey Mama, My Time Ain’t Long,” while Marco Gutierrez and Sean “Nino” Cooper of El Paso’s Dirty River Boys collaborated with Hubbard on the cautionary border anthem “Down by the River” and Ronnie Dunn of Brooks & Dunn fame pitched in on “Bad on Fords.” After taking a shine to The Grifter’s Hymnal, Dunn invited Hubbard up to Nashville to write some songs together for a solo project he working on. Hubbard in turn was impressed by the country superstar’s legit Red Dirt roots and rock ’n’ roll attitude, so he figured Dunn might get a kick out of an idea he had about an unrepentant Okie car thief with a fast and furious pick-up line: “I’m bad on Fords and Chevrolets, but I’ll be good to you!” He figured right —though neither of them could have foreseen Red Rocker Sammy Hagar getting his hands on a demo of the song and cutting it first, on 2013’s Sammy Hagar & Friends. (“He does it a lot different than I do,” Hubbard deadpans. “We didn’t do any high kicks when we recorded it.”)

There’s a bit more to that particular story, which is but one of hundreds, if not thousands, of
colorful anecdotes Hubbard could tell about his long and eventful career — some going even further back than the one about how he came to write “Up Against the Wall, Redneck Mother,” which became one of the defining anthems of the entire progressive country era after Jerry Jeff Walker recorded it on his classic 1973 album ¡Viva Terlingua! He’s certainly got more than enough of them — and years of insight to match — to fill a book, which is something he finally got around to tackling after persistent prodding (and a bit of editing help) from friend and music writer Thom Jurek. After spending the better part of the last two years sifting through his memories and hashing them out on the page, Hubbard’s autobiography is off to the printer and due out this spring or summer right alongside The Ruffian’s Misfortune. It’s exceedingly Hubbard-ly title? A Life … Well, Lived.

His book may be finished, but Hubbard’s not done, well, living that life. And as long as he
keeps his gratitude higher than his expectations (to borrow a line from The Grifter’s Hymnal’s “Mother Blues,” pointedly delivered by Hubbard himself and not some wiseacre Aesop’s crow), his fortune going forward should be pretty good.

“As I look back, I’ve had some amazing cool things happen, but I still feel like I’m moving forward,” he says. “I still enjoy it, and I think there’s still plateaus to reach. I don’t know what they’re going to be, because I haven’t really sat around thinking about it; when I wrote
‘Mother Blues’ for the last record, I wasn’t thinking, ‘I’ll put this album out and try to get on Letterman’ — he just heard the song on Sirius Radio and called up and asked for us. So who knows what will happen with this record? All I know is I feel very fortunate right now in that I’m playing gigs that are really fun to do. And as long as I can keep writing and performing new songs, I think I could keep doing this for awhile. I saw some show once where Pinetop Perkins was playing at 90 years old, and Judy said, ‘You’ve got another 20 years in you!’”

www.raywylie.com